Saturday, June 9, 2018

Finding a Balance and So Long, Anthony

It's a dreary day outside my den window but I welcome these sorta days. We're between lines of thunderstorms and the birds are using the respite to fill the air with their songs. I've got nowhere that I need to be.

It's taken me nearly a few years of retirement but I've finally reached the point where I'll allow myself to take an afternoon nap. A nap was never something I could indulge in when I was working because it only made more of a mess of my sleep schedule than it already was. It's nice to know I can play that card pretty much whenever I choose to now.

I've been spending more time riding than golfing this year and I'm enjoying the change of pace. I sorta neglected my riding for my love of golf last year and although I have no regrets about my time spent walking the links, I wanted to find more of a balance this year.

While I enjoy the relaxed nature of a round of golf, it can't compare to a hard workout on any of my bikes. My fitness is still lacking on the bike but it's coming around and I find that to be encouraging. I still have issues with knee pain (and likely always will) so I especially enjoy days when they're both feeling good and allow me to go hard to where my quads are feeling the burn and my heart rate's history shows an abundance of time spent in the red zone afterward. A good ride will leave me with a satisfied feeling long after my bike has been put away. I also try and manage at least one to two days of long walks each week.

Toby woke me up before 6:00 AM yesterday as he typically does. I let the pups outside and went back in to turn on the TV and fill their bowls with food. I stood there stunned, hearing talk of the passing of Anthony Bourdain. I was especially saddened when I learned that he'd taken his life, leaving behind an 11-year-old daughter. What a tragic loss but just as tragic, what sort of demons must he have been battling?

It's understandable to question how someone who seemed to be blessed in ways unimaginable to the rest of us could throw it all away. But that's not how depression works. I'll get in an occasional funk where I'm feeling blue, but I can typically pull myself out of it by taking a quick inventory of my life's blessings then dutifully banish my pitiful thoughts. But that's me. I have to accept that for some my method isn't an option.

Sometimes I'll hear people say that God won't ever give you more than you can handle. I used to nod my head in agreement but I no longer do.

I loved his show for the way it gave us a glimpse of worlds unfamiliar to our own, and for his commentary. He was a remarkable man in a most down-to-earth way.

I think I'll go catch a quick nap then go for a walk; maybe the rain will be done by then.

(I just noticed that the video below needs to be opened on YouTube's page. Just follow the link. It's worth the extra click.)


Saturday, June 2, 2018

WWJD?

As I sorta figured would happen, my stained glass items on Etsy lost much of their rankings (for search engine queries) while I had my shop on vacation mode while we were away. It'll likely take awhile but I'm hopeful that they'll make their way back up in the rankings to where they were before we left.

I've been able to chip away a little at a stained glass project I'm doing for my brother Bryan and his wife Sue. I was hoping to have it done and mailed to them before they leave for vacation in July but I don't think I'll be able to finish it in time. The lure of being outside is simply too much for me this time of year as it always is. I'm trying to work on it just a couple hours at a time but even that's a big ask for me now. I'd include a photo here of the design but I want it to be a surprise for them.

Tammy and I made a fairy garden for Trinity Care Center where her mother is a resident. We're pleased with how it turned out. It's indoors and in a common area where it's easily seen. We thought it would be fun to occasionally change it up and add to it so it gives the residents a little something to look forward to. We hope little ones coming to visit their elderly relatives will also enjoy it.

I continue to struggle with the dismantling of the world I once knew, or perhaps it was all an illusion and I'm just now catching on. It wasn't that many years ago when Tammy and I were active members of a mega-church, volunteering with their Tuesday night services meant to reach the disadvantaged in the community and even going there to cast our election day ballots for every Republican candidate that was put before us because that's what good Christians do. We accepted the lip-service paid about welcoming all who came through the doors at Hosanna! -- except when it came time to allow "everyone" to participate in the functioning of the church. Those in the GLBT community need not apply. I had ditched my Republican ways long before penning this piece where I was examining and coming to terms with the role of the church in my life.

WWJD?

I'd had enough of the hypocrisy, and so I walked away. It would take Tammy a few more years but she would eventually do the same.

To christians (intentional lower case c), it became sport to bash a man who was working his heart out to try and right our nation after it was left teetering on the brink of economic collapse at the hands of those who claim the mantle of being fiscally conservative. It seemed they would rather see us fail as a country than to work with the man, fearing that their help may actually contribute to his success. Yet, in spite of them, he was successful.

The Affordable Care Act was far from perfect but it was a step in the right direction. What good, god-fearing person wouldn't want others to have access to decent healthcare? Apparently, the vast majority of christians. They had bought into a mob mentality of despicable thinking influenced by the divisive voices of conservative media and they fought side-by-side together to sabotage it. And they were largely successful. Did they never once stop and ask themselves, WWJD?

We're in the midst of a gun-violence epidemic in the U.S. but you'd be hardpressed to find many christian conservatives who care. They appear to have become so deluded by conservative media that they've put their love of guns ahead of any reasonable attempt to try and address the growing problem, say nothing of the thought about WWJD? The cold blue steel in their pocket is the real-deal while the crosses they wear are relegated to good-luck charms status. I long ago stopped wondering why our flags are flying at half-mast. There's one senseless tragedy after another anymore with little to distinguish one mass shooting from another, except the location. And the response is always the same: It's too early to talk about the politics and possible solutions.

The church has shamefully failed to lead in any sort of discussion with respect to immigrants fleeing the most desperate situations, situations that very few of us can even begin to imagine. In this poll by the respected PEW Research Center, only 25% of white evangelical Protestants feel the U.S. has an obligation to help refugees. What a sad reflection of those who most proudly identify as christians.

WWJD?

And then there's Trump*.